Sales Leads and the Cost of Overkill « ledgerleads_blog

Sales Leads and the Cost of Overkill



July 26th, 2014

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The idea of overkill is usually seen in one or two ways. The first is pulling out all the stops, regardless of victory already being achieved. The second is becoming excessive than necessary in order to accomplish a particular goal.

When generating sales leads, success can actually come in the form of one or the other. There are times when you end up outdoing yourself despite reaching, say, your monthly quota. How do you tell though if this is the sort of positive or negative sort of overkill?

Overkill and Overhead

For anyone in the finance industry, a good start would be to understand the concept of overkill alongside that of overhead cost. The latter is a good representation of spotting the bad sort of overkill because the bad sort is essentially inefficient. It uses too much of your marketing resources than it actually needs (which is something that you’d easily discover with the usual overhead value analysis).

On other hand though, what are some of the ways that B2B marketers can use to generate a positive sort of overkill?

  • Bonus benefits – Positive overkill isn’t so much an excessive use of force but exceeding expectation. Take the example of Hollywood and Comic-Con. The movie industry may not need it as a crucial marketing tool but it still makes for a nice cherry on top of the whole strategy.
  • Maintaining your edge – Likewise, this can keep your marketing strategies from slipping into mediocrity. Focusing on just getting the sales leads might actually risk diminishing their value as well as the business relationship that could follow. Extra effort for extra results gives you incentives to maintain your edge.
  • Encourage innovations – Finally, efficiency and innovation go hand in hand. It’s hard to think of better, bigger ways to increase your sales leads when you’re not pushing the current limit. What’s the point of saving up on resources if they’re not being used to at least grow your marketing arm?

Again, it’s not about excessive, wasteful use but exceeding the current expectations of your marketing strategy. It’s how you determine the next step because keeping up the usual score may not serve you well in the long-term.

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