Accounting Lead Generation Tips – Know How Your Product’s A Blessing AND A Curse « ledgerleads_blog

Accounting Lead Generation Tips – Know How Your Product’s A Blessing AND A Curse



October 25th, 2014

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The standard marketing and lead generation process always has you focusing on what a prospect would like most about your product. It pays though to remember how your product could also be a burden. It helps you anticipate everything from possible customer complaints as well as unintended consequences.

Here’s an example. There’s this app called PhotoMath which that puts the camera and calculator together to quickly solve hand-scribbled math problems.

From an accounting perspective, it could be a useful tool lying in your own device. But for math students, it’s their new best friend that could be their professor’s worst nightmare. It doesn’t look like you could cheat with it that easily, but the idea certainly feels implied there.

It’s clear that the problem isn’t just limited to quick-solving apps like these. Plenty of services and products can be both blessing and curse. To focus on just one side of those possibilities is to ignore the implications of the other. Here’s how to achieve balance:

  • Before and after feedback – Take a good look at your prospect now and then compared after they spend some time as your accounting customer. How was their past feedback different from their current one?
  • Understand necessities and priorities – If labor-saving is your pitch, you need to make sure your prospect doesn’t actually benefit much from the labor you’re reducing. Don’t just think about cost. Think about the skills they prioritize and how your services could drastically reduce them without knowing.
  • Look out for division – Sometimes a prospect will focus only on the blessings granted by a service but others in their organization will deem it a curse. Unless you can spot the divide, your company will have great difficulty getting the rest of the prospect’s organization to buy-in even with your primary decision maker’s support.
  • Create emergency guidelines – An extreme example is this military robotics company calling for a ban on its own products. When you realize both the perks and the perils of your own accounting services, you need to create a backup plan in case your prospect just realized too many of the perils.

Finally, understand that you might have to achieve this balance even before you get all the answers. The risk of your services having unintended consequences should be a risk you’re willing to take. There’s no point in a tight-rope act if you’re not actually in any danger of falling.

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